Universities encouraged to take care

Thursday, 13. December 2018

Valuable role: Dr Marie-Pierre Moreau said there was a “misrecognition” of care work as ” a disturbance”. She will speak from 1pm on Thursday in HB13 at Callaghan.UNIVERSITIES need to provide moresupport to academics who juggle their careers with caring for children or elderly or disabled relatives, according to a visiting scholar.
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The University of Roehampton’s Dr Marie-Pierre Moreau will speak at the University of Newcastle on Thursday about her recent research project, whichfocused on how a university’s policies affect academic staff who are carers, plus how an academic’s caring responsibilities affect their careers and lives.

“There’s a general lack of awareness and that’s to do with the history of higher education, where traditionally it was a male scholar who didn’t have any caring responsibilities or was able to rely on the support of his spouse to undertake the care work,” Dr Moreau said.

“We still have this ongoing care-free culture, so often caring responsibilities are dealt with on an individual level rather than in the workplace and that contributes to make them invisible.”

Dr Moreau said while academics were“relatively privileged”, their profession was also “very greedy on your time”.

She said she had found the degree of support universities provided to academic carers was usually “quite modest” and depended on “how flexible and supportive your line manager is”.

She said there was also a “hierarchy of care”, with more support provided to academics with visible caring responsibilities, for children.

“If you have an elderly father who lives on the other side of the country, it’s up to you to make appropriate arrangements.”

The result, she said, wasacademics who may feel drained, emotional and distracted.

“If universities want to continue to attract the best people, then they need to be accommodating and acknowledge they’re not care-free workers, they do have responsibilities outside the workplace.”

DrMoreau suggested universities regularly collect data on their staff’s caring responsibilities and use this to inform more inclusive policies.

“What will be the different effects on carers and non carers? Make sure care is embedded in every policy and that policies are reviewed before they’redeveloped to make sure they’re not [adversely] affecting carers.”

Virtually no limit to the potential of VR

Thursday, 13. December 2018

More than fun and games: Unreal VR co-founder Daniel Girgis, seated, with business partner Matt Thomas.
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NEWCASTLE has gained another virtual reality hub in Unreal VR.

Six months after VRXP opened in Watt Street, Unreal VR has openedon the Pacific Highway in Charlestown.

Co-founders and relatives Daniel Girgis and Matt Thomas said their decision to open the business they label a start-upwas based on the increasingly broad appeal of virtual reality technology.

“VR has been around for 40 years but I have been watching the space and it’s becoming more commercially viable because the technology is getting so powerful,” says Mr Girgis, an industrial designer who also has his own company.

The Charlestown studio has four VR stations, or rooms, separated by curtains as well as a driving and flight simulator that has been a drawcard for both thrill-seekers and retired pilots.

“We are trying to appeal to families, professionals and businesses and for this also to be a studio for research to test new applications of VR,” says Mr Thomas.

“People are coming in for a fun experience and that covers the rent, but the real potential is in research and development across many industries.”

The business stocks a range of VR experience programs for punters but with Mr Girgis’ “super geek” background, also plans to develop its own.

The men say the only limit on the potential use of VR is your imagination.

Already, VR is being used in education, sport (to help athletes practice), training and even health and therapy.

“We are working with some therapists to assist with mood displacement, using different colours and experiences to lift mood,” says Mr Thomas of the research potential.

“The application of the technology really drives us in giving people an experience that they could otherwise not get.”

There is increasing interest in VR from the real estate sector –with estate agents giving virtual tours of apartments they are pre-selling.

The latest technology allows the viewer to change and mix and matchdesign and decor features of the home to allow the viewer to get a feel for what the final product will resemble.

Until recently the CEO of publicly-listed debt collection specialists Collection House, Mr Thomas relocated to Newcastle six months ago to be closer to family.

“I’m an escapee from the corporate world,” he says with a grin.

As such, he’s excited about the use of VR for training and team building purposes,providing an environment that gives people a chance to fail with a soft landing: “Anything that helps people work together more selflessly is a good thing,” he says.

Sew and steady wins

Thursday, 13. December 2018

Material gains: Mulberry and Flax owner Jennifer Smart in her Islington store. Picture: Penelope GreenOUR rapidly moving society is driving a resurgence back to pursuits of old, says the owner of the latest “crafty” business to open its doors in Newcastle.
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Former film industry veteran, author and screenwriter Jennifer Smart made the tree change to Newcastle two years ago and decided to invest in her love for fabrics and yarn.

“My sister had just died of a heart attack and it made me reassess and realise that life is short,” she says.

“I have always had a passion for knitting and fabric so I thought about how to make it work.”

In April last year she opened Mulberry and Flax, which specialises in high-end fabrics that she largely sources from the US but also in small quantities from Japan.

She recently relocated to Maitland Road, Islington, where she has more space to expand her range.

The daughter of a knitter and sewer, Ms Smart stocks a range of Liberty prints: “I think my fondness for them comes from my grandmother,” she says.

She also sellsa wide range of ethically produced fabrics that are mostly hand-made and largely using Australian yarn.

She retails European silk by labels including US fashion designer Tory Burch and currently has in stock a black silk fabric featuring gold lurex that was used by Kate Moss in her Capsule Collection.

She has sourced organic, Indian hand-block painted fabrics and Pirate Purl yarns made with superfine merino wool that is dyed in Newcastle.

Mulberry and Flax is a havenfor those who knit, crochet, weave, felt and sew.

“Most shops sell one thing for one craft,but if people have an interest in craft they tend to be interested in others,” explains Mrs Smart.

Briefly living in Newcastle as a child, she feels an affinity with the Hunter and is impressed by its creative kudos.

With workshops in weaving, knitting and crocheting afoot, she is noting interest from young women who want to get hands-on about craft.

“The faster that life becomes, we want to reach out to slower pursuits,” she says.

Nine-year-old asylum seeker gets compo for Christmas Island suffering

Thursday, 13. December 2018

The federal government has agreed to pay an undisclosed sum to a nine-year-old girl who was detained on Christmas Island.
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The deal ends a bitter, three-year legal battle which had initially aimed to secure compensation for thousands of asylum seekers.

The Iranian girl, referred to as “AS”, was held in detention on Christmas Island for almost a year, after arriving in Australia with her parents by boat in 2013.

A class action was launched on her behalf in 2014 against then-immigration minister Scott Morrison and the Commonwealth.

The girl’s lawyers argued that she developed post-traumatic stress disorder, a dental infection, a stammer and separation anxiety in detention, and still needs ongoing medical treatment.

Lawyers reached a compromise before the trial, which involves the government paying compensation to AS in exchange for her dropping her legal claim.

Supreme Court Justice Jack Forrest approved the confidential deal on Wednesday.

The deal comes after Justice Forrest last month halted the class action, ruling that other asylum seekers could no longer jointly sue the Commonwealth with AS.

The judge said that their personal injury claims were too different from hers and each other’s to be dealt with as a group.

This left AS alone in her claim against the government. She and her family have been living in the community on a temporary bridging visa since January 2015.

Outside court, Sister Brigid Arthur, the litigation guardian for AS, said that the girl and her family were relieved to put the case behind them.

“In one way while it’s an effort to get justice, it’s also an extra trauma for them, and an extra thing they were waiting for a response to,” said Sister Arthur, who is co-ordinator for the Brigidine Asylum Seekers Project.

While 35,000 asylum seekers were detained on the island between 2011 and 2014, it is unknown how many had signed on to the class action.

Tom Ballantyne, a principal of Maurice Blackburn, which represented AS, said outside court that while the deal was in her best interests, no amount of compensation could properly recognise what she and other asylum seekers had been through on Christmas Island.

Mr Ballantyne rejected the notion that the class action failed, saying Justice Forrest’s decision did not affect other Christmas Island asylum seekers’ legal rights to claim compensation separately.

“It in no way judged the actual conditions on Christmas Island,” Mr Ballantyne said.

“There are thousands of people who have been deeply affected by their experiences [in detention] and we encourage them to seek legal advice if they want to.”

The judge will make formal orders in the coming days, and the question of legal costs will be discussed in court next week.

A spokesperson for the Department of Immigration and Border Protection said the minister and the Commonwealth had made no admission of liability in relation to the matter.

“As this matter is still before the Court in relation to some outstanding issues, it would not be appropriate for the Department to comment further.”

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Global gas giants use loophole to avoid tax on billions

Thursday, 13. December 2018

Foreign-owned gas companies have legally avoided paying significant tax on billions in earnings from their Australian operations because of loopholes, according to a study.
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The loopholes have allowed the companies to write off interest payments for the borrowings of offshore subsidiaries, it has been claimed.

The study, by academic accountants at the University of Technology School of Accounting, and left-leaning campaign group GetUp, looked at the available balance sheet data of gas giants ExxonMobil and Chevron. It found the two companies have achieved colossal revenue flows from their Australian operations but paid little if anything in petroleum resource rent tax in recent years.

The practice is known as “debt loading” or “thin capitalisation”.

Over the two years 2013-14 and 2014-15, Chevron earned more than $6.12 billion in revenue, but paid nothing in PRRT, according to the assessment.

It found ExxonMobil achieved revenue of almost three times that at $18.08 billion in the same period, but paid only $803.5 million.

The study concluded that between the operation of the company tax rules and the petroleum resource rent tax regime these enormous multinational resources companies can “load up” their balance sheets withexcessive debt, thereby reducing taxable income to the point where the tax liability is low or non-existent.

The report, Investigation into the Petroleum Resource Rent Tax and Debt Loading in Australia – 2012 to 2016, found 95 per cent of oil and gas projects in Australia paid nothing in PRRT in 2014-15.

The case for reform has been boosted by a recent Federal Court ruling that went against Chevron Australia in a $340 million dispute with the Australian Tax Office for financial arrangements between 2004 and 2008. The full bench concluded the Australian arm had paid more in interest payments to its US parent company than would otherwise be necessary, thus reducing its taxable profits.

However, the company noted it had paid close to $4 billion in taxes and royalties since that period.

GetUp’s Natalie O’Brien said the interest payments on borrowings were designed to minimise or eliminate tax liabilities, that could otherwise fund schools and hospitals.

“Between 2013-2015, Chevron made over $6 billion in revenue in Australia. It paid zero dollars in PRRT, and they paid zero dollars in income tax,” she said. “That’s a rort.

“In the same period, ExxonMobil made $18 billion in revenue and paid no income tax.

“Australians are sick and tired of big corporations using their influence to increase their own power and profits, at the expense of the community and our environment.

“Every day people are being forced to deal with cuts to essential services – all because our politicians won’t stand up to these greedy gas giants.”

The government has commissioned independent expert Michael Callaghan, AM, to review the operation of the petroleum resource rent tax to assess its effectiveness at securing a suitable return for Australians from the development and sale of their mineral resources.

The PRRT was introduced in 1988 under the then Hawke Labor government, and was designed to tax profits at 40 per cent.

It differs in this crucial respect from state royalties, which tax according to volume and thus do not differentiate between highly profitable ventures and those that might be marginal or even loss-making.

However, profitable income under the PRRT is calculated after the deduction of eligible expenses and where these expenses exceed revenue in a given year, such losses can be carried forward to the next year for deduction. This means high capital start-up costs, can be amortised over years, rendering apparently lucrative projects free of PRRT liabilities.

“The good news is that we can fix this,” Ms O’Brien said. “We can close the loopholes, and recover enough to restore every last cent of Coalition cuts to local hospitals and fully fund Gonski needs-based school funding reform – twice over.”

“Debt loading refers to a tax avoidance strategy where business operations and investments are funded with excessive debt rather than equity,” the UTS report authors note.

“Excessive use of debt compared to equity creates ‘debt loaded’ or ‘thinly capitalised’ structures. Debt loading is often used by subsidiaries of multinational entities to shift profits from high to low tax jurisdictions.”

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Gang member’s claim he was kept in tiny cell borders on inhumane: judge

Tuesday, 13. November 2018

Justice Peter Hamill was unconvinced: “What, [must I] give them 50 years and just hope they are not locked in a cage for that period?”
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In the midst of sentencing submissions for three members of the once-feared Brothers for Life gang, Justice Hamill was presented with an affidavit from the youngest, Jamil??? Qaumi???.

Jamil, 25, claims he has spent much of his 3?? years on remand under extremely onerous conditions, including being kept in a tiny cell for 24 hours a day and being placed in handcuffs during meetings with his lawyers.

Jamil and his brothers Farhad – the former leader of the gang’s Blacktown chapter – and Mumtaz Qaumi were convicted over a string of violent crimes carried out during the group’s reign in Sydney in 2013.

The crimes included the manslaughter of Mahmoud Hamzy in Revesby Heights, soliciting to murder Brothers for Life member Michael Odisho and shooting a teenage girl.

Farhad, 34, and Mumtaz, 32, are also being sentenced for organising the murder of debt collector Joe Antoun at his Strathfield home in December 2013.

The Crown has submitted Farhad and Mumtaz should be sentenced to life behind bars, while Jamil should attract a substantial prison term.

In an affidavit, Jamil said that, when housed on remand at Silverwater Correctional Centre, he is restricted to his cell 24 hours a day because there are Brothers for Life (Bankstown chapter) members in the main population.

“I cannot use the library, access common areas or education facilities or gain employment within the correctional centre,” he said.

For the past two years he has been in segregation. His cell has a two-by-two metre “yard”, which consists of a concrete floor with concrete walls and bars.

“It is not large enough to run and I can only walk approximately three steps before reaching the edge of the ‘yard’,” he said.

He is restricted to two phone calls a day, is handcuffed and locked in a “glass and metal cage” when meeting lawyers and can only receive pre-approved visits from family members.

On Wednesday, Justice Hamill said he found Jamil’s complaints “extraordinarily troubling”.

He called on the offenders’ lawyers to provide the court with further evidence as to their incarceration and, in particular, the likelihood of such onerous conditions continuing once their sentences had been determined.

“If I have some evidence that someone is locked in a two-by-two metre cell and can only take three steps and ??? they are locked in that cell 24 hours a day and the evidence is unclear whether those conditions will continue ??? I think that is bordering on the inhumane,” he said.

In considering either life imprisonment or a sentence of “incredible magnitude”, Justice Hamill said he must be given more information as to the conditions in which the men would be kept.

Crown prosecutor Philip Hogan said Jamil had not always been kept under such strict conditions, and his conditions might be relaxed once he is sentenced and classified by Corrective Services.

“What, give them 50 years and just hope they are not locked in a cage for that period?” Justice Hamill said.

Jamil said he understands much of his sentence may be spent in segregation because the non-association order is unlikely to be lifted.

“I would like to be able to get a job whilst I am in custody but as I am in segregation and have non-association orders, I am unable to work. If my non-association orders are not lifted I may never be able to work whilst in custody,” he said.

Justice Hamill ordered the offenders’ lawyers to provide the court with further evidence about their custodial arrangements. Another hearing will be scheduled in May before sentence is imposed on June 16.

The judge noted the three brothers have chosen not to attend court on several occasions. While he said it was important the men were in court when sentence is handed down, he also noted there were concerns about the safety of Corrective Services officers involved in transportation between the jail and the court.

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Maitland’s most-loved Groovin artists

Tuesday, 13. November 2018

Maitland’s most-loved Groovin artists PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL
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PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Boy and Bear PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Boy and Bear PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Golden Features PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Danny Brown. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Danny Brown. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Danny Brown. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

The Rubens PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

The Rubens PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

The Rubens PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Shelby Craig of New Lambton and Sophie O’Brien of New Lambton PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Elizabeth Banney and Simon Strath of Nelson Bay. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Twenty One Pilots. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Twenty One Pilots. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Calvin Vidigal and Tayla Craig of Sydney. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Calvin Vidigal and Tayla Craig of Sydney. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Aiden Gazi and Shannon Jennings of Penrith. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Abbey Mesnforth of Glen Valley and Jess Wells of Eleebana. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Abbey Mesnforth of Glen Valley. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Monique Cooper of Singleton and Tenille Oliver of Rutherford. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Emira Harris, Reiana Murphy and Shannon Motley all of Forster. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Monique Cooper of Singleton and Tenille Oliver of Rutherford. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

A light rain shower sends everyone running for cover. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

A light rain shower sends everyone running for cover. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

A light rain shower sends everyone running for cover. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

osh Lamb of Nelson Bay. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Rhea Ashton of Scotts Head and Riley O’Keefe of Coffs Harbour. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Rhea Ashton of Scotts Head and Riley O’Keefe of Coffs Harbour. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Skye Allen of Port Macquarie, Briony Lane and Blake Clarke of Forster. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Miles of smiles at Groovin The Moo Maitland. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Fans watching British India. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Fans watching British India. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Fans watching British India. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

British India performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

British India performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

British India performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Blinged up for Groovin the Moo Maitland 2016. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Safia performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Safia performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

TweetFacebookMaitland top streamed tracks1) Snakehips –Don’t Leave2) PNAU –Chameleon3) Amy Shark –Adore4) Milky Chance –Cocoon5) Snakehips –All My Friends6) Amy Shark –Weekends7) Allday – In Motion(feat. Japanese Wallpaper)8) Hilltop Hoods – 1955(feat, Montaigne, Tom Thum)9) Thundamentals –Something I Said10) Milky Chance –Stolen DanceMaitland top streamed artists1) Snakehips2) Allday3) Amy Shark4) PNAU5) Milky Chance6) Tash Sultana7) Thundamentals8)The Wombats9)The Smith Street Band10) Dillon FrancisRelated contentGroovin the Moo dates set

Groovin the Moo lineup announced

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Carole Wilkinson’s Dragonkeeper to become an ambitious animated film

Tuesday, 13. November 2018

Josh Lawson in the short flim The Eleven O’Clock Photo: NoneThe first of Melbourne writer Carole Wilkinson’s six Dragonkeeper children’s fantasy novels is to become an animated film.
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An ambitious co-production between Spain and China, announced at the Beijing Film Fair, is to be directed by Ignacio Ferreras (Wrinkles) and co-directed by Zhang Bo. It is being seen as the first movie in an international franchise.

Set in ancient China during the Han dynasty, the novel centres on a slave girl named Ping who journeys across the country with the last imperial dragon while pursued by a ruthless hunter.

“I am thrilled that Dragonkeeper is being made into a movie, and especially pleased that there is such strong Chinese involvement, ensuring that the ancient China represented in the movie will be authentic,” Wilkinson said in a statement.

The animation will be carried out in Illion Animation Studios in Spain and by China Film Animation and several studios in China.

Chinese films headed this way

The Dragonkeeper deal is not the only new Australian connection to Chinese film. A visit by an Australian delegation to Beijing has triggered a slew of announcements about films that will shoot in this country.

One is the Australian-Chinese co-production At Last, about a Beijing couple who find themselves caught in an art heist while visiting Australia. It is written and directed by Yiwei Liu, with casting underway for a shoot in Queensland that is expected to start in mid-July.

Sydney Films has also announced a slate of 14 films that are being developed as Chinese-Australian co-productions, with Dalei Guo’s comedy A Trip to Australia, about three aspiring rock’n’roll musicians who accidentally end up in Australia, and Once Upon A Time In The Northeast, a comedy about a former child star and an animator who accidentally make a hit film, expected to shoot in NSW later this year.

They follow the Chinese-Australian co-production Guardians of the Tomb, formerly Nest, which shot in Queensland, and the Jackie Chan film Bleeding Steel, which shot in Sydney.

St Kilda’s Palais ready for festival

The newly restored Palais Theatre will be ready to host the St Kilda Film Festival next month.

Ten days of screenings will be the first event in the historic venue after refurbishment, with more than 2700 guests expected on the red carpet on May 18.

Festival director Paul Harris has announced a program that includes, in the top 100 short film competition, Derin Seale’s comedy The Eleven O’Clock, starring Josh Lawson and Damon Herriman in a story about a psychiatrist and a delusional patient; and Dave Carter’s comic animation Fish with Legs, voiced by Frank Woodley and Barry Otto and centring on a school of fish who grow legs.

The SoundKILDA program will feature music videos from the likes of Courtney Barnett, Client Liaison and Lisa Mitchell.

The Australian arm of multinational entertainment company Live Nation took on the restoration work after winning a tender for the long-term lease of the iconic theatre.

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Famous Perth properties left on the shelf for months may finally be sold

Tuesday, 13. November 2018

Perth median house price drops but shows signs of stabilisationLuxurious Brisbane sky home sells to mystery buyerClassic yet contemporary: The hottest property on the market
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Prime pieces of property in Perth’s most sought-after suburbs that have been waiting months or even years for buyers may finally be snapped up as the local real estate market shows signs of stabilisation.

Australia’s most famous “superblock” is set to go under the hammer next month and expressions of interest in another famous address, the former site of socialite Rose Porteous’ mansion Prix D’Amour, are closing this week.

In the March quarter, Perth’s media house price had its lowest rate of annual decline in more than 18 months, according to Domain Group data.

The empty 6582-square-metre superblock landholding, at 2 Bayview Terrace, Peppermint Grove, once destined to be home to a $70 million Perth palace for Pankaj and Radhika Oswal with six bedrooms, a temple and parking for 17 cars, has been on the market since October.

The sprawling site sat incomplete since the couple left Australia in 2010 when the ANZ bank called in more than $US500 million ($648 million) in loans and appointed receivers to their Burrup fertilisers business.

The site, which is being marketed by Vivien Yap, of LJ Hooker Claremont, and William Porteous, of William Porteous Properties International, could see it either sell via auction conditions as a one super lot or purchased via individual parcels.

Mrs Yap said the uniqueness of the site was behind the decision to take the property to auction.

“The vendors amalgamated the site to a size that you seldom see this close to the city, let alone with the surrounding amenity and residential values,” she said.

“It’s near impossible to put a price on such a rare offering, so the vendors have opted for an auction to allow the market to decide what the site is worth.”

In February, selling agents announced a plan to split the block into six lots.

Mrs Yap said the auction, to be held on Saturday, May 27, could be held in two ways.

“Firstly, we will open bidding for the entire site; that will allow either single buyers or a syndicate of buyers to come forward,” she said.

“A single buyer may want the site for an iconic residential vision or a syndicate may wish to subdivide. Now that the former incomplete residence has been removed, the site presents an extraordinary blank canvas.

“If the sale of the site in its entirety does not eventuate, we’ll invite bidding for individual allotments on the site ranging in size from 1000 to 1151 square metres. This offering is unique in itself as most of the parcels throughout Peppermint Grove are around 1500 square metres in size: this is a boutique opportunity.”

In Mosman Park, a palatial house at another famous address is on the market with an asking price of about $15.25 million.

The house that replaced Rose Porteous’ Prix D’Amour at 149 Wellington Street has sprawling views of the Swan River, a glass domed elevator, underground gym, marble flooring, seven bedrooms and a four-car garage.

It is also being sold by Mrs Yap, with colleague John Hunter, of LJ Hooker Dalkeith and Claremont, with offers closing on Wednesday.

Owners John and Lilian Clinton, who purchased the lot in 2008, are selling because they have relocated to Los Angeles.

According to Domain data, the owners have been trying to sell the home since March 2015 via expressions of interest and later, an initial asking price of $18 million.

Mr Hunter said the home, which is set across a 1610-square-metre double block, was custom built by Zorzi Builders in 2010.

“It’s absolutely one of a kind in every aspect. You don’t have any other properties in that location that actually are on two blocks,” he said.

“So it’s an amazing location and the views are just phenomenal. You actually have a north orientation solar aspect while still having a river view. But the house itself is very grand.

“It’s over the top and really amazing.”

Described in its Domain listing as “Gatsby-esque”, the three-level art deco-style house boasts seven bathrooms, an underground wood-panelled cellar, a towering foyer with a glass chandelier, a horseshoe driveway, an alfresco area with a pizza oven and staff or guest quarters.

The state-of-the-art kitchen overlooks the pool and the Swan River.

Mr Hunter said the layout of the home suited a family, in particular a multi-generational family because of the lift that accesses three levels.

Other features include smart systems, a Sonos entertainment system and remote-controlled curtains, lighting and front security gates.

Mr Hunter and Mrs Yap have estimated the replacement cost of the home would be more than $20 million. Mr Hunter said there had been strong interest from overseas buyers looking to relocate to Australia.

Across the river, 30 Jutland Parade, Dalkeith, has been on the market since November 2015. The character home, with panoramic river views, was first listed for sale by Anderson Davies Real Estate for $5 million and has now been reduced to $4.7 million.

The other superblock: Denby Roberts’ Mosman Park land has been on the market for more than four years. Photo: Supplied

Another “superblock,” at the corner of Hill Terrace and Johnson Parade in Mosman Park, also remains on the market since it was first listed in 2012.

The 3664-square-metre landholding is adjacent to the Swan River and is owned by Denby Roberts, the only daughter of the late Multiplex founder John Roberts.

Selling agent William Porteous, of William Porteous Properties International, said he was open to offers.

“But the offer has to be around $30 million and at the moment no one is going to pay that,” he said.

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Coca-Cola Life disappears from Australian shelves

Tuesday, 13. November 2018

Alison Watkins CEO Coca Cola, with new product, coke life, on their balcony in North Sydney. Thursday 30th October 2014 AFR photo Louie Douvis Photo: Louie DouvisThe Coca-Cola Company has dropped its Coke Life brand from Australian shelves after spending two years and millions of dollars trying to launch the reduced-calorie beverage as it tries to adapt to an increasingly health-conscious market.
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The soft drink giant launched the drink, made with the natural sweetener stevia, locally in February 2015 in an effort to lure back lapsed Coke drinkers with a product that was less unhealthy than regular Coke and tastier than the sugar-free Zero and Diet varieties.

Life’s launch was followed by heavy supermarket discounting by Coca-Cola and its competitors.

But less than a year later, Coca-Cola and Australian bottler Coca-Cola Amatil started experimenting with the Life recipe to try and reduce the sugar content further, suggesting the brand was failing to sell as expected.

The Life brand was finally axed as part of a branding overhaul in January, but its disappearance has gone largely unnoticed.

Life has been replaced by a new product called Coca-Cola with Stevia, which has 50 per cent less sugar than regular Coke, or about four teaspoons in each 375ml can instead of nine teaspoons. Life had 35 per cent less sugar than regular Coke.

A Coca-Cola South Pacific spokesman said the company had “changed the name to call out ‘stevia’ so as to better communicate to consumers that it is a lower sugar option”.

He said the new recipe hit a better balance between taste and sugar levels. The Life brand was also recently dropped in Britain, but is still available in other markets, including the US. Sugar hit

Coca-Cola Amatil, which has the licence to bottle and sell Coca-Cola products in Australia, has been trying to adapt its product range as consumers turn their backs on sugary drinks. It has invested heavily in water brands like Mount Franklin and Pump, sales of which are growing at about 19 per cent a year but are also under price pressure from private label bottled water.

The soft drink bottler, which is 29 per cent owned by global giant The Coca-Cola Company, reported that soft drink sales fell 4.7 per cent by volume in Australia last financial year, while scan data obtained by Fairfax Media earlier this year revealed the amount of soft drinks sold in major Australian supermarkets slumped almost 3 per cent in 2016.

Coca-Cola Amatil was hammered on the Australian Stock Exchange last week, with its share price falling more than 10 per cent after it downgraded its earnings because of weak local beverage sales.

The company said that all channels were “experiencing volume and price pressure due to competition and category trends”.

Coca-Cola Amatil is trying to cut costs, announcing in February it would close its South Australian beverage manufacturing plant and cut about 180 jobs as part of a $90 million supply chain restructure.

The US-based Coca-Cola Company on Tuesday revealed it would cut 1200 American jobs through to 2018 as part of a $US800 million ($1 billion) savings drive in response to a 20 per cent slump in profit and an 11 per cent drop in overall sales.

Coca-Cola Amatil generated a $257 million full-year net profit last year, down from $403 million the year before.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.